#freeBree

"Well-behaved women seldom make history."

This morning, June 27th, Capitol police arrested and took into custody Bree Newsome for taking down the Confederate flag at South Carolina capitol. Bree climbed the flag pole to take it down. The confederate flag, once the flag of the Confederate States of the United States, symoblizes the union of states during mid-19th century that left the United States of America in devotion to maintaining slavery in face of a growing abolition movement. Bree was accompanied by fellow organizers in a multiracial group of Carolinians led by teachers and activists who believe that "It's time for a new chapter where we are sincere about dismantling white supremacy and building toward true racial justice and equality." This simple protest comes in the wake of the Charleston Massacre, where Cynthia Marie Graham Hurd (54), Susie Jackson (87), Ethel Lee Lance (70), Depayne Middleton (49), Clementa C. Pinckney (41), Tywanza Sanders (26), Daniel Simmons (74), Sharonda Coleman-Singleton (45), and Myra Thompson (59) were maliciously shot and killed during a bible study. "We could not sit by and watch the victims of the Charleston Massacre be laid to rest while the inspiration for their deaths continue to fly above their caskets," Bree says. While the flag is only symbolic, its power is not only evident through the demonstration but also through a white supremacist rally that followed at 11 A.M. as the flag was raised again.

She now faces charges of defacing a monument. Since this morning, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People has issued as statement in support of Newsome's civil disobedience as well as calling upon state prosecutors to recognize the moral inspiration to climb a 30-foot flag pole and take down a flag early in the morning.

To see the flag being taken down. Watch: https://twitter.com/deray/status/614809495538003969

To sign the petition calling for the release of Bree Newsome, go here: http://act.colorofchange.org/sign/DropTheFlagDropTheCharges/

 

 

 

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